John Joubert: Song-Cycles and Chamber Music

John Joubert: Song-Cycles and Chamber Music

The music of John Joubert – born in 1927 in Cape Town, a student at the Royal Academy of Music in London in the 1940s and ’50s, and Birmingham-based since 1962 – has a strong sense of melody, his beguiling lyricism combining with an acute sensitivity to words to produce songs that are both colourful and evocative. These four song-cycles pay tribute to the places and poets that inspired them. And his chamberworks, drawing on a rich instrumental palette and haunting melodic lines, are memorable and dramatically effective.

Lesley-Jane Rogers, soprano
John Turner, recorder
Richard Tunnicliffe, cello
John McCabe, piano

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Catalogue No: TOCC0045
EAN/UPC: 5060113440457
Release Date: 09.07.2007
Composer: John Joubert
Artists: John BcCabe, John Turner, Lesley-Jane Rogers, Richard Tunnicliffe

Listen To This Recording:

    The Hour Hand, Op. 101, for soprano and recorder (1982)

  1. The Hour Hand
  2. Cock ’round the Clock
  3. Horizontal Beams
  4. Low Tide
  5. Winter Sun
  6. Shropshire Hills, Op. 155, for high voice and piano (1982)

  7. Shropshire Hills
  8. Early Spring in the Marches
  9. Clun Forest
  10. Improvisation, Op. 120, for recorder and piano (1982)
  11. Kontakion, Op. 69, for cello and piano (1982)
  12. The Rose is Shaken in the Wind, Op. 137, for soprano and recorder (1982)

  13. Spring Day in Arrowtown
  14. Tombstone Song
  15. The Gardener’s Song
  16. The Rose is Shaken in the Wind
  17. Six Poems by Emily Brontë, Op. 63, for soprano and piano (1982)

  18. Harp
  19. Sleep
  20. Oracle
  21. Storm
  22. Caged Bird
  23. Immortality

1 review for John Joubert: Song-Cycles and Chamber Music

  1. :

    “They burst with his characteristic melodic inventiveness and vivid word setting and are beautifully captured here by Lesley-Jane Rogers. Chamber pieces are also included, with John McCabe, who has long championed Joubert’s work, in fine form at the keyboard.” —Stephen Pritchard, The Observer

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